Slaveholders and Slaves: The List

slavaerybutton1
Home
Documentation
Slaveholders and Slaves: The List
Small Family Memories

Articles:

•Slavery in Mamaroneck Township: Remembering Bet, Phelby…
Two Local Slaves “Recaptured”
More Slaves At Heathcote Hill
Local Slaves Found in Canada
Joseph Stewart, “Governor” Slave 

Slaveholders and Slaves in Mamaroneck Township

 Revised: December 1, 2016
Slaveholder
Slaves
What We Know
Captain James Mott
Male, name unknown
The 1698 census of Mamaroneck lists a male slave of Captain Mott. Captain Mott lived in Mamaroneck prior to 1711. (Spikes 1991, p. 21a)
Samuel Palmer
Female, name unknown
The 1698 census lists a female slave of Samuel Palmer. The Palmer family lands encompass much of what is the Village of Larchmont today. (Spikes 1991, p. 11, with a complete discussion, pp. 9-21a)
Ann Richbell
Female, name unknown
The 1698 census lists a female slave of Ann Richbell. According to Spikes (1991, pp. 8-8a), Ann Richbell lived on the East Neck, which today is known as Orienta in Mamaroneck Village, and is buried on a knoll between Mamaroneck Harbor and Rushmore Avenue.
James Horton
Jin
In January 1765 a slave named Jin ran away from James Horton, who posted a Runaway Notice in the New York Mercury. James Horton may be related to Deborah Horton, listed below as having 7 slaves in the 1790 census.
 

 
 
jamesmottJames Mott
 

 

billginnycensusJinny, Banjo Billy James Mott was a great-grandson of John Richbell and a distant relative of Captain James Mott (above). He was a wealthy Quaker merchant and preacher who moved in 1776 to what is now known as the Mill House on Pryer Manor Road. (Spikes 2003, p.17) His 2 slaves also appear in the memoirs of his grandson, Richard Mott. As Quakers, the Motts were opposed to slavery. Yet, the census reveals that James Mott maintained 3 slaves as late as 1810.
Eleazer Goddin
John Cox
According to the Book of Negroes, compiled in 1783, Eleazer Goddin was the owner of John Cox, who was born around 1755. Cox became a black loyalist, fighting on the side of the British in the Revolutionary War. His name, along with that of his wife and 2 children, appears on the 1783 passenger manifest of the Clinton, a ship transporting freed black loyalists to Annapolis, Nova Scotia.

They disembark in Saint John and set out to make new lives for themselves and their families. Facing many hardships, including racist restrictions on their new-found freedom, Cox stays on, and perhaps Jeremy Cox, who marries in nearby Gagetown in 1806, is one of his sons.

Ben Cole
Andrew Cole
Ben Cole is listed in the Book of Negroes as the owner of Andrew Cole, who was born around 1757. Andrew Cole, with his wife Mary, appears on the same passenger manifest as John Cox, above.They disembark in Saint John and set out to make new lives for themselves and their families. Facing many hardships, including racist restrictions on their new-found freedom, they take different paths. Cole may have emigrated to Sierra Leone where he was promised greater freedom and land. 
William Sutton
Jane
William Sutton appears in Township records as setting Jane free on July 8, 1786. He was a Mamaroneck Town Supervisor, and lived on land we know today as Orienta. (Spikes, 1991, p. 25) William Sutton is mentioned in the Will of John Sutton in 1752, who was his father,
Elizabeth Allaire
5 male slaves, names unknown
She appears in the Census of Slaves by Captain Joseph Sutton in 1755.
Peter Allaire
Jack and 3 name   unknown
Peter Allaire appears in the census of 1790 as holding 4 slaves. The Allaire family lived in much of what is considered Larchmont Manor today. For a map of the Allaire estate, see Spikes, (1991, p. 32 and 33)

In January 1790, Jack ran away from Peter Allaire who posted a Runaway Notice in the Connecticut Courant. The notice said that Jack called himself Free Man John.

Oliver Belly
1, name unknown
Oliver Belly appears in the census of 1790 as holding one slave. He lived north of the Post Road bordering on New Rochelle. (Spikes, 1991, p. 13)
Gilbert Budd
Susannah, Jack, Bet, Pheby, Phebe, Daniel, Hannah, Henry, Peter, Peter Jr., Sarah, Charles, Hannibal, Jack Purdy, Eliza
Gilbert Budd lived on the East Neck. (Spikes, 1991, p. 34) He was the Mamaroneck Township Clerk and recorded many of the entries in the Town records relating to slave ownership and manumission.

The slaves listed here by name are identified in various records as being owned by Budd. The 1790 census lists 12 slaves in his household, the 1800 census lists 9, and the 1810 lists 8. But other records of ownership, deaths and births do not square with the census numbers.

For example, Budd started 1790 with 12 slaves, then freed one in 1799, and acquired two more by birth, presumably leaving him with 13. Yet the 1800 census has him with 9. Perhaps 4 died and their deaths were not recorded.

Similarly, he started 1800 with 9 slaves, then freed 1 and acquired 5 by birth, which should have totaled 13. Yet the 1810 census shows only 8. Perhaps 5 died.

An alternative hypothesis, which cannot be tested with the information available, is that Gilbert Budd sold some of his slaves.

Susannah appears in Township records as being set free by Budd on January 26, 1799.

Jack appears in the Township records as being set free by Budd on March 27, 1799. This may be the same person as Jack Purdy, listed as the father of Eliza in 1809.

Bet appears in the Mamaroneck Township records as the mother of Pheby, who was born on July 12, 1799 and registered by Gilbert Budd as his property. Bet is probably the same person listed as mother to Peter (1802), Charles (1805), and Eliza (1809).

Phebe appears in the Mamaroneck Township records as the mother of Daniel, who was born on July 8, 1799 and registered by Gilbert Budd for for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude.

Hannah appears in the Mamaroneck Township records as the mother of Henry, born on November 11, 1800, and of Sarah, born on November 22, 1802. Budd registered both children or for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude.

Bet reappears in the Mamaroneck Township records as mother of Peter, born on February 1, 1802. This is probably the same woman as Pheby’s mother, above.

Peter appears in the Mamaroneck Township records as the father of Sarah (whose mother was Hannah, above).

Bet reappears in the records as mother to Charles, who was born on September 10, 1805 and registered by Gilbert Budd or for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude.

Hannibal appears in the Mamaroneck Township records as being set free on August 20, 1808. This may be the same person as Hannibal Lemmore, who is listed under “other free persons” in Middletown, Connecticut’s 1810 census.

Jack Purdy appears in the Mamaroneck Township records as the father of Eliza, born on October 26, 1809; Bet is listed as the mother. This may be the same Jack freed by Gilbert Budd in 1799 (see above). However, Eliza’s status was based on her mother’s enslavement. Budd registered Eliza or for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude.

Elizabeth Duncan 1, name unknown Elizabeth Duncan  appears in the 1790 census as having 1 slave.
Absolom Gidney 4, names unknown Absolom Gidney appears in the 1790 census as having 4 slaves.
Isaac Gidney
1, name unknown Isaac Gidney appears in the 1790 census as having 1 slave. He is the grandson of Eleazor Gedney for whom the Eleazor Gedney Burial Ground in Mamaroneck is named.
Benjamin Griffen
5-7, possibly Peg, James and Jack and 2-4 with names unknown
Benjamin Griffin appears in the 1790 census as having 5 slaves.  He might have been related to Henry Griffen who operated a storehouse in Mamaroneck. (For more about the Griffens, see Spikes, 1991, p. 13) This may be the same Benjamin Griffen who freed Peg, according to Town records, on March 27, 1799.

Father (1717-1792) and son (1753-1798) both went by Benjamin Griffin.

In July 1784 James ran away and Benjamin Griffen (most likely the father but possibly the son) who posted a Runaway Notice in the New York Packet and the American Advertiser.

In November 1796, another slave named Jack also ran away, and this time Benjamin Griffen the son posted a Runaway Notice in Greenleaf’s New York Journal and the Patriotic Register

Bartholomew Hadden
3 in 1790, names unknown, 1 in 1755 named Arron
Bartholomew Hadden appears in the 1790 census as having 3 slaves. In 1755 he is listed as owning Arron by a colonial census.
Deborah Horton  At least 7 slaves, names unknown. Charley, Charles Johnson and Andrew may be additional slaves or some of those listed without names in the census. Deborah Horton appears in the 1790 census as having 7 slaves, and in 1800 as having 5 slaves. She reported none in 1810 or 1820, but set one free (Andrew, below) in 1822. She lived on the East Neck,today called Orienta. (Spikes, 1991, p. 34)

According to Township records, Deborah Horton freed Charley on March 27, 1799. She freed Charles Johnson on April 4, 1801. There is a “Charles Johnson” who appears in the “other free persons” category in the New York City census of 1810.

Township records show she freed Andrew on January 17, 1822.

Edward Merritt
Harry, Gin, Peg and at least 5 others with names unknown.
Edward Merritt appears in the Captain Joseph Sutton Census of 1755 as having one slave.

Edward Merritt appears in the 1790 census as holding 8 slaves, and in 1800 as holding 8 slaves. Gin was the mother of Peg, born on March 29, 1800 and registered by Edward Merritt as his property. Township records indicate that Merritt set Harry free on March 27, 1799. 

John Merritt 5, names unknown John Merritt appears in the 1790 census as holding 5 slaves.
Mary Palmer
2, names unknown Mary Palmer appears in the 1790 census as holding 2 slaves.
Charles Rowe
1, name unknown Charles Rowe appears in the 1790 census as holding 1 slave.
Giles Simmons
1, name unknown Giles Simmons appears in the 1790 census as holding 1 slave.
Mary Sutton 2, names unknown Mary Sutton appears in the 1790 census as holding 2 slaves. She may have been related to William Sutton, listed above. She might also have been related to Joseph Sutton who operated a storehouse in Mamaroneck. (For more about the Suttons, see Spikes, 1991, p. 13)
Charles E. Duncan
Esther, Charlot
Charlot was born on November 18, 1799, daughter of Esther, and was registered by Charles E. Duncan or for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude.. Duncan purchased land in 1799 on the north side of the Post Road near the New Rochelle border. (Spikes, 1991, p. 31)
Henry Disinborough, Jr.
4, names unknown
Henry Disinborough, Jr. appears in the 1800 census as holding 4 slaves.
William Grey
1, name unknown
William Grey appears in the 1800 census as holding 1 slave.
John Pinkney
1, name unknown
John Pinkney appears in the 1800 census as holding 1 slave, and in the 1810 with 1.
Nathaniel Sachet
2, names unknown
Nathaniel Sachet appears in the 1800 census as holding 2 slaves.
 
John Sands
2, names unknown
John Sands appears in the 1800 census as holding 2 slaves. John Sands might be a relative of Nathaniel Sands, who lived on land along Weaver Street. (See Spikes, 1991, note 406.)
William Thompson
Nelly, Sally
Sally was born on April 15, 1800, daughter of Nelly, and was registered by William Thompson for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude.
peterjaymunroPeter Jay Munro
Candice, Nelly, Charlot
Peter Jay Munro was the original resident of the Manor House in Larchmont and a nephew of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Munro does not appear as a slaveholder in the Mamaroneck U.S. Census in 1790. He maintained his legal residence in New York City, and reported his 4 slaves to the census there in 1790. However, Mamaroneck Township records show he freed Candice on November 19, 1803 and reported the birth of Charlot, to mother Nelly, on May 25, 1814.
David Rogers
Plato, Lilly, Nanny, Harry Rogers
Census records show David Rogers had no slaves in 1790, 1 in 1800 and 3 in 1810. Township records show Plato was born on September 24, 1803, with no parents identified, and was registered by David Rogers or for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude. Nanny was born on December 18, 1806, daughter of Lilly, and was registered by David Rogers or for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude. Harry Rogers appears in the Township records as being set free on May 25, 1813.
 
John Peter  D’Lancey
Nanny Pott, Tom Pott, Tom Pott, Jr., Tamar Pott, Jack Purdy, Dorothea (or Dorathea), Lewis, George, a child named Anne or Nancey.
 
Margaret (Peg), Peter and his wife, Abraham, Sam, Phebe,  Jack Purdy, Nanny, Betty Halley, Lewis and Michael are referenced in the DeLancy Family papers. 
 
Fred, Harriet, Henry, several children, a cook, as well as a couple named Joseph and Harris.
 
Angevine
John Peter DeLancey (also spelled D’Lancey, 1753-1828), was a Revolutionary War soldier and the father of William Heathcote DeLancey (1797-1865), a well-known Protestant Episcopal clergyman and provost of the University of Pennsylvania. J.P. DeLancey reported no slaves in his household in the 1810 census, but did report eleven “other free persons” – a category for non-white persons who are not slaves – sharing his home. This may be a recording error, or an intentional deception, since he regularly reported in Township records about his slaves.

Tom Pott, Jr. was born on September 25, 1805, son of Nanny and Tom Pott, and was registered by John P. D’Lancey or for more than 2 decades of indentured servitude. Tamar was born on April 21, 1808, son of Nanny and Tom Pott, and was registered by J. P. D’Lancey for indentured servitude. Jack appears in the Township records as being set free on November 15, 1808. George was born on October 10, 1809, son of Dorothea and Lewis, and was registered by J. P. D’Lancey for indentured servitude A child named Anne or Nancey was born on October 12, 1814, daughter of Harriet, and was registered by J. P. D’Lancey for indentured servitude.

The following are transactions documented in the Bills of sale in the De Lancey Family Papers, Museum of the City of New York. The source is the Mamaroneck History Facebook page

  • 1793 March 29: Margaret (Peg) 10 yrs old, $30 – for life – from Charity & Jonathon Purdy, Executors of Joseph Purdy’s estate (White Plains)
  • 1793 April 13: Report: “Slave given to Elizabeth Delancey, John Peter’s wife.”
  • 1795 June 30: Tom 15 yrs old, $85 – for life – from Benjamin Decker of Northfield, Richmond County (Staten Island)
  • 1796 September 07: Simon (Sime) 25 yrs old, $100 – for life – from Abraham Van Alen of Kinderhook, Columbia County (upstate almost to Albany) Simon escapes in 1809 as documented in 1809 Runaway Notice John P. De Lancey pursues Sam or Simon Woodbeck.
  • 1797 March 24: Peter 45 yrs old, wife 35 yrs old, Abraham 5 yrs old, Sam 9 mths old, $180 – for life – from Valentine Nutter of New York City
  • 1797 April 13:  Description & Reward for a runaway slave, Simon. Simon also escapes in 1809 as documented in 1809 Runaway Notice John P. De Lancey pursues Sam or Simon Woodbeck.
  • 1798 August: 10 Phebe 16 yrs old, $60 from H. G. Livingston of New York City
  • 1803 March 30: Jack Purdy 30 yrs old, purchased for 5 years from Hakaliah Purdy
  • 1804 February 07: Nanny (Nan) 22 and her baby sold to Bartholemew Ward of Mamaroneck
  • 1805 April 22: Nanny 23 yrs old, and infant, $80 purchased for 5 years, back from Bartholemew Ward.
  • 1806 April 14:  Betty Halley 16 yrs old, $125 purchased for 8 years from Ruth Ward, Eastchester. “Which manumission is to take place at the end of eight years from the first day of May next, which will be in the year one thousand eight hundred and fourteen – provided, however, if the maid Betty should have a child or children during her servitude she will serve one additional year for every child before she is entitled to her freedom, a witness my hand and seal this fourteenth day of April, 1806.” Signed, J.P. De Lancey
  • 1806 May: Lewis, boy, $250 purchased for 12 years.
  • 1807 May 14: Betty Halley sold to Peter Underhill
  • 1809: Mike (Michael), boy, $100 purchased for 5 years, 8 mths.
  • 1809 March 02: This entry is NOT about J.P. De Lancey. “I just thought you might like to know that Jack Purdy, former “time servant” of J.P. De Lancey (purchased for five years in 1803) fathered a daughter Eliza with Gilbert Budd’s slave Bet.” This suggests that, now a freeman, Jack remained in Mamaroneck.

The references to Fred, Harriet, Henry, Joseph, Harris, several small children and a female cook are in Small Family Memories.

Angevine is mentioned in documention of the Angevine Cemetery in Scarsdale: “Cooper’s father-in-law John Peter Delancey may have owned a slave named Angevine at Heathcote Hill.”

Christopher Hubbs
Jack
Jack appears in the Township records as being freed by Christopher Hubbs on November 15, 1808.
Jane Merritt, also listed as Jane Merrill
Grace, Benjamin, Harry (also called Tuder)
Township records show Benjamin was born on February 28, 1808, son of Grace, and was registered by Jane Merritt as her property. It is not clear what happened to Grace and Benjamin, as only one slave appeared in the household as part of the 1810 census

Jane was probably the wife or daughter of Edward Merritt, because this relationship is implied by a runaway slave notice that described her as the executrix of Edward Merrill’s (probably Merritt’s) estate. (For more about the Merritts, see Spikes, 1991, p. 13)

In March 1808, a slave called Harry ran away from “Jane Merrill.” We know this because she posted a Runaway Notice in the New York Commercial Advertiser. Jane Merrill is probably Jane Merritt (see immediately above) and her name was spelled incorrectly in the notice. The notice states that Harry belonged to “the estate of Edward Merrill” who is probably the same person as “Edward Merritt” listed above.

Curiously, the description for Edward Merritt refers to the manumission of a slave called “Harry” in 1799, which suggests that Edward Merritt had two slaves called “Harry.”

John Darby
Unknown
John Darby appears in the 1810 census as holding one slave.
Henry Merritt
Unknown
Henry Merritt appears in the 1810 census as holding 1 slave.
James Gray
Rose, Telemaque
Rose and Telemaque appear in the Township records as being set free by James Gray on December 12, 1810.
John Pinkney
Catherine
Catherine appears in the Township records as being set free by John Pinkney on April 2, 1811.
James Mott
Andrew
Andrew appears in the Township records as being freed on May 17, 1811 by James Mott, who purchased him for that purpose. The Township record states: “I having purchased of Joshua Purdy a negro man named Andrew who is about 26 years of age, he has the promise of the person I bought him of that he should be free at 28 years of age, and as one object I had in view in the purchase was to secure his freedom, I do hereby declare the said Andrew to be a free man from the date hereof Mamaroneck 15th of May 1811.” Joshua Purdy lived in Rye.
Jack Budd
Mary Jack
Mary Jack appears in the Township records as being freed by Jack Budd on December 12, 1812.
Joseph Haight
Harry
Harry appears in the Township records as being freed on March 20, 1817.
Note: Book references are to Spikes, Judith Doolin, Larchmont New York, People and Places, (Larchmont NY, Fountain Square Books, 1991) and Spikes, Judith Doolin, Images of America – Larchmont (Arcadia Publishing, 2003). The images of James Mott and Jinny and Banjo Billy are from page 17, Images of America – Larchmont.
Note: This post is based on information presented first by Ned Benton in a Larchmont Historical Society presentation in 2006. Originally, there were separate tables for the slaves and the slaveholders.  The merged table above includes revisions and additions made in December 2016.